About Us

The Montana Alzheimer’s/Dementia Work Group

was established in June 2014. It is a state-wide partnership consisting of several key national, state, and local partners interested in improving care and support to Montanans with Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias, their families, and caregivers. The Work Group consists of members representing multiple industries and stakeholder groups including the Alzheimer’s Association, the Senior and Long-term Care Division of the Department of Public Health and Human Services, the Governor’s Office, other government agencies, patient advocacy groups, patient advocates (caregivers), Assisted Living/Long-Term Care facilities, senior services groups, regional healthcare organizations and providers, the Veteran’s Administration, educators, researchers, legislators, Montana’s Native American population, and the LGBT community.

The Work Group’s Mission Statement

The Montana Alzheimer’s / Dementia Work Group exists to thoroughly understand the needs of Montanans affected by Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias, and to recommend and implement the best ways possible to detect, manage and support the individuals, their families and caregivers across the spectrum of the diseases.

The Work Group’s 4 NEW Goals

Expand
Expand efforts to support public awareness, prevention, and early detection of ADRD.
f
Enhance
Enhance quality, access, and coordination of ADRD care.
d
Support
Enhance and expand supports for family caregivers.
f
Advance
Advance ADRD research and encourage evidence-based practices and enhance data capabilities related to dementia impact and effects of interventions.

The Work Group’s Vision Statements

From the State Plan
Updated May 24, 2017

The Montana Alzheimer’s / Dementia Work Group exists to thoroughly understand the needs of Montanans affected by Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias, and to recommend and implement the best ways possible to detect, manage and support the individuals, their families and caregivers across the spectrum of the diseases.

All Montanans are aware of and comfortable talking about aging issues and topics inherent to the aging process including Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, legal and financial issues, preparation for end-of-life care, the need to create aging and dementia friendly communities, and where to find resources and support. Furthermore, the citizens of Montana are aware of how to reduce the risk of dementia, the early signs and progression of the disease, the value and importance of caregivers, and the need for first responders, advocates and citizens to be able to detect and competently support these individuals.

1

Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias participate in decision-making to the best of their ability, remain independent as long as possible, and receive dignified, high quality, person-centered care throughout their lives regardless of where they live, their financial status, culture, or gender identity. They are aware of opportunities to participate in research and clinical trials.

2

Family caregivers experience support as they care for family members with dementia throughout the disease trajectory, are valued for the work that they do, and receive person-centered care for themselves.

3

Health care providers use evidence-based practices to diagnose and manage Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias effectively. They recognize the benefit of early disease detection, a multi-disciplinary team approach to care, and early referral to community resources and support. Montana health care providers exist as a work force in adequate numbers, and are valued for the work they do caring for individuals with these complex diseases.

4

Montana policy makers and state officials understand the public health crisis Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias present, including:
• The financial impacts and potential challenges to Montana’s citizens and communities.
• The need to implement policies and systems to strengthen the quality of care provided.
• The need to sustain the ability of individuals with dementia to live independently as long as possible.
• The need to support research that proposes innovative ways to more effectively detect, prevent, manage, and support this vulnerable population.

Vision Statements name the world we want to create. They are intentionally lofty and hard to accomplish, and attainable only over a long-time line. They serve to inspire us. They are not measurable, but the goals to achieve these outcomes will be. Vision statements are more than one sentence long because we can’t encapsulate everything that we want to accomplish in just one sentence; instead we are ambitious!